Sanabil Holdings (Pvt) Limited Blog What you need to know about investing, whether you’re a woman or a man, says study

What you need to know about investing, whether you’re a woman or a man, says study

What do you do when you’ve got money to invest?

Is it an opportunity to make a life-changing investment?

And do you really want to know?

Is there any truth to the myth that men and women are different?

The new research from the University of Toronto and the University for Women in Canada shows that women are less likely than men to invest in the same stocks, according to a study published today in the Journal of Financial Economics.

Women are also less likely to invest at all.

The study, which tracked 2,835 women and 1,741 men between 2005 and 2015, found that women were significantly less likely, on average, to invest than men.

Women were also significantly less willing to invest when they were older.

The study was based on information gathered from 2,903 women and 2,739 men ages 18 to 65 who had taken a financial survey on their investments.

It was funded by the Ontario Women’s Foundation.

More women are investing than men, says Dr. Annemarie Cossa, the lead author of the study.

But it’s not because they’re less likely.

Women are less willing because they don’t want to miss out on a huge opportunity.

In general, women were more likely than the men to report that their portfolios were “not well diversified,” she said.

“But there were some very important differences.

“So we think that this might be a reflection of the fact that the women are not really as confident about diversifying as men.” “

It’s not a myth, says professor of finance at the University and University of British Columbia, Robert Stinson. “

So we think that this might be a reflection of the fact that the women are not really as confident about diversifying as men.” 

It’s not a myth, says professor of finance at the University and University of British Columbia, Robert Stinson.

He says the gender gap is real, and not a result of sexism or a cultural stereotype.

Stinson says the findings suggest that women have a much higher level of confidence in their portfolios than men do.

“In fact, it’s the case that the average female investor is less confident about her portfolio than the average male investor,” Stinson said.

“We found that men are more confident about their portfolios compared to women, and it’s also clear that the men who are less confident are less active.”

Women tend to be less interested in investing for the long term, he says.

They may prefer to spend more money on a smaller amount of time.

The study, titled “Gender Differences in Investment Intentions,” found that between 2006 and 2015 there were an average of 22 women and 11 men aged 18 to 64 who were actively seeking investment opportunities, or investing at least $2,000 per month.

The majority of those women were female, although it was also found that half were male.

While the women’s level of interest was higher, the men’s was not. 

“There was a much smaller gap between women’s and men’s level, so it appears that men’s and women’s levels of investment intentions are similar,” said Stinson, who is a member of the university’s Faculty of Finance.

He said the findings do not indicate that investing in the short term is more risky than investing for a long time.

“But the gender difference in investing, and the fact it’s so small, is actually more interesting because it suggests that women invest in longer-term, higher-return investments,” he said.

What are the key findings of the research?

Overall, women have higher levels of interest than men in investments, with men spending more time on their portfolios and women more likely. 

On average, women invest more than men for the same amount of money.

However, women are also more likely, even though they are investing less, to report they are not diversifying.

They are also far less likely at all to invest their money in stocks that are not well diversible, including those that pay lower dividends, which are generally viewed as risky investments.

This suggests that the gender divide is more about women’s willingness to invest and less about the gender of their investment.

Women’s lower levels of confidence also suggests they are less interested than men are in long-term investment opportunities. 

In terms of investment intent, women report investing less than men and, at least in this study, are less actively seeking investments.

However there are still some significant differences. 

Women are more willing to make investments at all than men because they do not want to leave behind a large portfolio.

But they are far less willing at all times, such as when they are younger.

For the average woman, the difference between the level of investment intention of men and of women